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We can supplie and fit an electric vehicle charge point to your home or buisness at very competative rates. Contact us for a free no obligation quotation.

18 Comments to electric vehicle charge points:

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electricians Adelaide on 13 May 2013 10:11
Outstanding information shared about installation of electric vehicle charge point at hone and business at very less rates.
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Approved Electricians on 19 September 2014 17:45
Hey, that's a great idea, there will be lots of electric cars on the roads before too long.


Solar Led Lights New Zealand on 29 July 2013 07:43
of course like your web site however you need to check the spelling on several of your posts. Several of them are rife with spelling problems and I find it very bothersome to tell the reality nevertheless I'll definitely come back again.
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perth electrician on 09 April 2014 10:37
Is it really?? I was looking to get in such services and finally found the information here and very much willing to get the services. Thanks a lot dude :)
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Auto Marketing on 09 April 2014 11:17
I was looking forward such kind of post electric vehicle charge points.I have been much benefited to get this informative site. Thanks a million friend. Carry on
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panama city limo on 13 May 2014 14:00
The matter written on your blog really keeps tying the reader till the end .A Car Insurance plan is not just mandatory by law but is an excellent means of caring for your car as well.
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ellenbrook electrician on 20 May 2014 07:00
I have some electric car but their is no electric charger point. Hopefully, if i transfer my car store near your point then i can get the opportunity.
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bulk sms service provider in india on 12 July 2014 08:37
Is that you look at my mind! You seem to know a lot about this, like you wrote the book or something. It is my opinion that you can do with some pics to drive the message a bit, but other than that, this is an excellent blog. Much research. I will definitely return.
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Today's Commodity Tips on 06 July 2015 12:08
these equipment with the intention that everyone successfully moved round our own kitchen Starting from your breakfast feeding, in addition to ceasing typically the afternoon baths can be non-stop in the feet
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Sure Share Market Tips on 04 March 2016 12:20
Thanks for the information... keep posting this type of information its very useful for readers...
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Sophie on 21 March 2016 11:14
Is that you take a gander at my brain! You appear to know a considerable measure about this, similar to you composed the book or something. It is my sentiment that you can do with a few pics to drive the message a bit, yet other than that, this is a fantastic online journal. Much research. Thank you so much.
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Katherine on 02 April 2016 11:49
Is it truly!!?? I was hoping to get in such administrations lastly found the data here and all that much willing to get the administrations. Thanks!
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royaltonauto on 09 September 2016 10:39
Author's note: If you have any diesel powered equipment in California, you are probably aware that diesel engines are now subject to substantial regulations. The following is a primer on the origins of diesel regulations in California. Introduction Diesel particulate matter (PM) has been identified as the most significant toxic air contaminant in California; accounting for 70% of the ambient airborne cancer risk. In response to this, the State of California has enacted the most comprehensive and ambitious program to reduce ambient diesel pollution in history. Diesel emissions are a classic example of an un-internalized externality. The users of diesel engines gain the benefits of the device, yet do not pay the real costs in terms of health and welfare effects. This paper will discuss the legislative background, research on health and welfare affects, emissions inventories, verified emission control technologies and regulatory programs that have been enacted to reduce the risks associated with diesel PM. Legislative Mandate and Research on Health and Welfare Effects In 1983, the California Legislature passed Assembly Bill (AB) 1807: Health and Safety Code sections 39650-39674. AB 1807 mandated that the state conduct a two-step process to first identify TACs and then develop risk reduction programs to address the identified risks (1). In February 1998, the California Air Resources Board published its exposure and health risk assessments for diesel exhaust (2), (3). On April 22, 1998, the report was formally reviewed and approved by the Scientific Review Panel (SRP) (4). The approved report relied on over 30 human epidemiological studies and was considered the most exhaustive study the SRP had ever reviewed (4). The approved report characterized diesel exhaust as, “a complex mixture of gases and fine particles.” And found that nearly all of the particulate fraction of diesel exhaust was < 10µm and the 94% of the particulate fraction was < 2.5 µm. Particles of this size penetrate deeply into lung tissue and thus, are a regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The report also estimated that PM accounts for 2000 premature deaths per year, 250 annual cases of lung cancer, decreased lung function in children, chronic bronchitis, increased respiratory symptoms and cardiovascular hospitalizations, aggravated asthma, lost work days, reduced visibility and contributed to global warming (5). A Side Note to TAC Legislation Background: FRAUD In 2009, nine months after a landmark decision by the Air Resources Board approving regulations to curb diesel exhaust in California, a firestorm erupted over the academic credentials of project leader Hien T. Tran, who conducted a crucial study on diesel pollution-related deaths. Tran admitted that he did not have the Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Davis, as he claimed during the hiring process for his position. In fact, Tran, in fact holds a Ph.D. from Thornhill University, a school that appears to be an internet diploma mill located, as one wag put it, in a UPS office in New York City. Source: allgov.com, (http://www.allgov.com/usa/ca/departments/california-environmental-protection-agency/air-resources-board?agencyid=120) retrieved 1/9/15 Emissions Inventories and Projections The 1998 estimated diesel PM emissions from on-road, off-road, portable and stationary sources was 28,000 tons/year (1). CARB models project 21,000 tons of emissions from those same sources in 2010 and 17,000 tons in 2020. This 40% reduction over 20 years was deemed to be insufficient to control the significant risk posed by diesel PM. CARB instead proposed a program that they believe will reduce diesel PM emissions by 75% (down to 7000 tons /year) in 2010 and 85% (down to 4200 tons /year) in 2020 (6). To achieve these reductions, CARB has proposed a three-pronged approach: New PM emissions standards for all new diesel engines, new retrofit requirements for existing diesel engines, and a new 15-PPM sulfur diesel fuel formulation (1). Non-Road/Off-Road Emission Standards 13 CCR, 2425.


Mark Schuler on 02 September 2016 21:17
I should take your service for my car. My electric vehicle charge point has some problem that's why it is important to check it out. I will be driving my own car in the near future with the help of no credit auto loan and this blog provides huge information that is useful for future car owners like me. Thanks!
Reply to comment
 
fastautotags on 09 September 2016 10:36
Author's note: If you have any diesel powered equipment in California, you are probably aware that diesel engines are now subject to substantial regulations. The following is a primer on the origins of diesel regulations in California. Introduction Diesel particulate matter (PM) has been identified as the most significant toxic air contaminant in California; accounting for 70% of the ambient airborne cancer risk. In response to this, the State of California has enacted the most comprehensive and ambitious program to reduce ambient diesel pollution in history. Diesel emissions are a classic example of an un-internalized externality. The users of diesel engines gain the benefits of the device, yet do not pay the real costs in terms of health and welfare effects. This paper will discuss the legislative background, research on health and welfare affects, emissions inventories, verified emission control technologies and regulatory programs that have been enacted to reduce the risks associated with diesel PM. Legislative Mandate and Research on Health and Welfare Effects In 1983, the California Legislature passed Assembly Bill (AB) 1807: Health and Safety Code sections 39650-39674. AB 1807 mandated that the state conduct a two-step process to first identify TACs and then develop risk reduction programs to address the identified risks (1). In February 1998, the California Air Resources Board published its exposure and health risk assessments for diesel exhaust (2), (3). On April 22, 1998, the report was formally reviewed and approved by the Scientific Review Panel (SRP) (4). The approved report relied on over 30 human epidemiological studies and was considered the most exhaustive study the SRP had ever reviewed (4). The approved report characterized diesel exhaust as, “a complex mixture of gases and fine particles.” And found that nearly all of the particulate fraction of diesel exhaust was < 10µm and the 94% of the particulate fraction was < 2.5 µm. Particles of this size penetrate deeply into lung tissue and thus, are a regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The report also estimated that PM accounts for 2000 premature deaths per year, 250 annual cases of lung cancer, decreased lung function in children, chronic bronchitis, increased respiratory symptoms and cardiovascular hospitalizations, aggravated asthma, lost work days, reduced visibility and contributed to global warming (5). A Side Note to TAC Legislation Background: FRAUD In 2009, nine months after a landmark decision by the Air Resources Board approving regulations to curb diesel exhaust in California, a firestorm erupted over the academic credentials of project leader Hien T. Tran, who conducted a crucial study on diesel pollution-related deaths. Tran admitted that he did not have the Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Davis, as he claimed during the hiring process for his position. In fact, Tran, in fact holds a Ph.D. from Thornhill University, a school that appears to be an internet diploma mill located, as one wag put it, in a UPS office in New York City. Source: allgov.com, (http://www.allgov.com/usa/ca/departments/california-environmental-protection-agency/air-resources-board?agencyid=120) retrieved 1/9/15 Emissions Inventories and Projections The 1998 estimated diesel PM emissions from on-road, off-road, portable and stationary sources was 28,000 tons/year (1). CARB models project 21,000 tons of emissions from those same sources in 2010 and 17,000 tons in 2020. This 40% reduction over 20 years was deemed to be insufficient to control the significant risk posed by diesel PM. CARB instead proposed a program that they believe will reduce diesel PM emissions by 75% (down to 7000 tons /year) in 2010 and 85% (down to 4200 tons /year) in 2020 (6). To achieve these reductions, CARB has proposed a three-pronged approach: New PM emissions standards for all new diesel engines


Ear damage and hearing loss on 08 September 2016 21:36
As a car owner, this is a great opportunity to get electric vehicle charge when I'm in home. People should take your service in order to prioritize time. Thank you so much for this information and I will try it as soon as possible when I need this.
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fastautotags on 09 September 2016 10:35
Author's note: If you have any diesel powered equipment in California, you are probably aware that diesel engines are now subject to substantial regulations. The following is a primer on the origins of diesel regulations in California. Introduction Diesel particulate matter (PM) has been identified as the most significant toxic air contaminant in California; accounting for 70% of the ambient airborne cancer risk. In response to this, the State of California has enacted the most comprehensive and ambitious program to reduce ambient diesel pollution in history. Diesel emissions are a classic example of an un-internalized externality. The users of diesel engines gain the benefits of the device, yet do not pay the real costs in terms of health and welfare effects. This paper will discuss the legislative background, research on health and welfare affects, emissions inventories, verified emission control technologies and regulatory programs that have been enacted to reduce the risks associated with diesel PM. Legislative Mandate and Research on Health and Welfare Effects In 1983, the California Legislature passed Assembly Bill (AB) 1807: Health and Safety Code sections 39650-39674. AB 1807 mandated that the state conduct a two-step process to first identify TACs and then develop risk reduction programs to address the identified risks (1). In February 1998, the California Air Resources Board published its exposure and health risk assessments for diesel exhaust (2), (3). On April 22, 1998, the report was formally reviewed and approved by the Scientific Review Panel (SRP) (4). The approved report relied on over 30 human epidemiological studies and was considered the most exhaustive study the SRP had ever reviewed (4). The approved report characterized diesel exhaust as, “a complex mixture of gases and fine particles.” And found that nearly all of the particulate fraction of diesel exhaust was < 10µm and the 94% of the particulate fraction was < 2.5 µm. Particles of this size penetrate deeply into lung tissue and thus, are a regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The report also estimated that PM accounts for 2000 premature deaths per year, 250 annual cases of lung cancer, decreased lung function in children, chronic bronchitis, increased respiratory symptoms and cardiovascular hospitalizations, aggravated asthma, lost work days, reduced visibility and contributed to global warming (5). A Side Note to TAC Legislation Background: FRAUD In 2009, nine months after a landmark decision by the Air Resources Board approving regulations to curb diesel exhaust in California, a firestorm erupted over the academic credentials of project leader Hien T. Tran, who conducted a crucial study on diesel pollution-related deaths. Tran admitted that he did not have the Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Davis, as he claimed during the hiring process for his position. In fact, Tran, in fact holds a Ph.D. from Thornhill University, a school that appears to be an internet diploma mill located, as one wag put it, in a UPS office in New York City. Source: allgov.com, (http://www.allgov.com/usa/ca/departments/california-environmental-protection-agency/air-resources-board?agencyid=120) retrieved 1/9/15 Emissions Inventories and Projections The 1998 estimated diesel PM emissions from on-road, off-road, portable and stationary sources was 28,000 tons/year (1). CARB models project 21,000 tons of emissions from those same sources in 2010 and 17,000 tons in 2020. This 40% reduction over 20 years was deemed to be insufficient to control the significant risk posed by diesel PM. CARB instead proposed a program that they believe will reduce diesel PM emissions by 75% (down to 7000 tons /year) in 2010 and 85% (down to 4200 tons /year) in 2020 (6). To achieve these reductions, CARB has proposed a three-pronged approach: New PM emissions standards for all new diesel engines, new retrofit requirements for existing diesel engines, and a new 15-PPM sulfur diesel fuel formulation (1). Non-Road/Off-Road Emission Standards 13 CCR, 2425.1 was amended in 2004 to include more stringent non-road/off-road emission standards. This regulation provides standards for PM, NOx, NMHC + NOx and CO for new engines manufactured after 1996. Emission standards are categorized by tier, 1 through 4, and Horse Power (HP). Different tiers have different phase-in dates according to HP (7). Emission standards are summarized on the two tables below: Table 1. Tier 1, Tier 2, and Tier 3 Exhaust Emission Standards (grams per kilowatt hour) Table 2. Tier 4 Exhaust Emission Standards (grams per kilowatt-hour) Both Tables from (7) On–Road Heavy-Duty Diesel Emission Standards California adopted tough new on-road heavy-duty diesel emission standards in October of 2001. These new standards limit PM emissions to 0.01 g/bhp-hr, NOx to 0.20 g/bhp-hr and NMHC to 0.14 g/bhp-hr for heavy-duty on-road diesel engines manufactured in 2007 and later. The new standards also removed the exemption for crankcase emissions from turbocharged diesel engines (8). These standards mirror Federal standards adopted by the EPA in 2000. Approved Control Technologies The State of California verifies Diesel Emission Control Strategies (DECS). Verified control strategies include Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF), Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) with DPF, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), emulsified fuels and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with DPF. Manufacturers must test DECS units to determine the level of effectiveness they provide and verify what engines the DECS is effective at controlling. Verified DECS are grouped by efficacy, the highest level of control is provided by Level 3 DECS, which reduce diesel particulates emissions by >85%. Level 2 DECS provide >50% reduction and Level 1 DECS provide >25% reduction. Systems that provide 50 HP (Installed and permitted on or after January 1, 2005) Table 4. In-use Stationary Diesel Engine > 50 HP (Installed and permitted on or after January 1, 2005) Both tables from (12) In addition, the ATCM required all operators to refuel with ULSD when it became available (September 1, 2006), limited CO, HC, NMHC, and NOx emissions for new engines, mandated regular engine maintenance and created new recordkeeping requirements. CARB estimates that the Stationary Compression Engine ATCM can reduce PM emissions by 500 tons/year in 2010 and 700 tons/year in 2020 (10). Portable Compression Ignition ATCM Portable compression ignition engines contribute approximately 7% of the diesel PM emissions produced annually in California. Without regulatory intervention, emissions were projected to shrink by approximately 50% in 2010 and 75% in 2020. On February 9, 2005, the Portable Compression Engine ATCM was filed with the Secretary of the State. The regulation became effective on March 11, 2005. This ATCM created a new section, 93116, in Title 17, CCR. Emergency amendments were approved by the OAL on December 27, 2006, and will be affective for 120 days. Permanent amendments are currently pending. The ATCM requires all portable engines to be comply with EPA/CARB Tier 1, 2, or 3 off-road engines standards by 2010. After 2010, all portable engines are required to meet diesel PM emission averages that become more stringent in 2013, 2017, and 2020 (12). Table 5. Diesel PM emission standards for portable engines by date and HP group. Table from (12) The Portable Compression Ignition ATCM was estimated to reduce annual PM emissions by 700 tons in 2010 and 252 tons in 2020 (10). Transportation Refrigeration Unit (TRU) ATCM On November 10, 2004, the Office of Administrative Law approved the Transportation Refrigeration Unit ATCM. This ATCM created a new section, 2477, in Title 13 CCR. TRUs are small portable engines used to heat or cool perishable food items during transportation. They are typically fitted to railcars, diesel semi trailers and delivery trucks. Most of these engines are small (9-36 HP) but they are numerous and often congregate in transportation facilities, distribution centers and trucks stops creating localized high levels of PM exposure for nearby receptors. This regulation requires new engines to meet stricter emission standards, older engines to be retrofit with particulate filters or use alternative, cleaner burning fuels (13). Mobile Source ATCMs As of May, 2006, California has adopted seven ATCMs to reduce PM emissions from mobile diesel sources. These include: transit busses, trash trucks, school bus idling, on-road truck idling, auxiliary diesel engines and diesel-electric engines operated on ocean-going vessels within California waters, mobile cargo handling equipment at ports and intermodal rail yards and on-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles operated by public agencies and utilities (12). In addition, CARB is currently developing rules to regulate private on-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles and all off-road diesel vehicles. All of these programs seek to reduce diesel PM emissions by changing behavior, as in the case of idling limits, or reduce emissions by setting emission standards for new engines and require older engines to retrofit with approved control technologies. CARB estimates that mobile source programs can reduce diesel emissions by over 10,000 tons statewide in 2010 (1). Conclusion Diesel PM is a long-standing air quality issue in California. The goals of the Diesel Risk Reduction Program are lofty and its execution will be challenging. Currently the two most substantial sources, private on-road heavy-duty diesel fleets and off-road fleets, are in the rule making process. Both of these sources have ample resources and substantial lobbying power. The success of the program rides on the ability of CARB staff to hold their ground and create real and substantial reductions of emissions from these sources. California is the most populous state in the nation. The high population creates many environmental challenges and often forces California to be on the leading edge of environmental regulations. The high population also makes California a very lucrative market and allows California to pass regulations that are “technology forcing.” If California can successfully implement the Diesel Risk Reduction Program, other states and nations will soon follow suit. References 1. Risk Reduction Plan to Reduce Particulate Matter Emissions from Diesel-Fueled Engines and Vehicles (October, 2000) retrieved March 30, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/documents/rrpFinal.pdf 2. Report to the Air Resources Board on the Proposed Identification of Diesel Exhaust as a Toxic Air Contaminant, Part A, Exposure Assessment (April 22, 1998) retrieved March 30, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/toxics/dieseltac/part_a.pdf 3. Report to the Air Resources Board on the Proposed Identification of Diesel Exhaust as a Toxic Air Contaminant, Part B, Health Risk Assessment for Diesel Exhaust (May, 1998) retrieved March 30, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: ftp://ftp.arb.ca.gov/carbis/regact/diesltac/partb.pdf 4. Findings of the Scientific Review Panel on The Report on Diesel Exhaustas adopted at the Panel’s April 22, 1998, Meeting. Retrieved March 30, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/toxics/dieseltac/combined.pdf 5. Health Effects of Diesel Exhaust Particulate Matter (March 1, 2006) retrieved March 30, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/diesel/dpm_draft_3-01-06.pdf 6. Report to the Air Resources Board on the Proposed Identification of Diesel Exhaust as a Toxic Air Contaminant, Appendix III, Mobile Diesel-Fueled Engines: Report on the Need for Further Regulation of Particulate Matter Emissions (October, 2000) retrieved March 30, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/documents/rrpapp3.PDF 7. Off-Road Compression-Ignition (Diesel) Engines and Equipment Documents (April 20, 2005) retrieved April 10th, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/offroad/orcomp/documents.htm 8. Heavy-Duty Truck and Bus Engines (2001) retrieved April 10th, 2007 from the Diesel Net Website: http://www.dieselnet.com/standards/us/hd.html#y2007 9. Verified Technologies (February 20, 2007) retrieved April 10th, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/verdev/vt/vt.htm 10. Report to the Air Resources Board on the Proposed Identification of Diesel Exhaust as a Toxic Air Contaminant, Appendix II, Stationary and Portable Diesel-Fueled Engines: Appendix to the Diesel Risk Reduction Plan (October, 2000) retrieved March 30, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/documents/rrpapp2.PDF 11. Ultra-low sulfur diesel (March 30, 2007) Retrieved from the Wikipedia Website on April 10, 2007: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ULSD 12. Fequently Asked Questions Regarding the Stationary Diesel Engine ATCM (May 8, 2006) retrieved April 10th, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/documents/atcmfaq.pdf 13. Transport Refrigeration Units (April 5, 2007)retrieved April 10th, 2007 from the California Air Resources Board Website: http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/tru.htm
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Tonya K. Ibanez on 09 September 2016 10:42
I should take your service for my car. My electric vehicle charge point has some problem that's why it is important to check it out. I will be driving my own car in the near future with the help of no credit auto loan and this blog provides huge information that is useful for future car owners like me. And I think your service will be very helpful in the future. Thanks!
Reply to comment

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